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Digital computer drawing pad tablet XP-Pen Deco 03 Review
Article publié le 21/05/2018

The XP-Pen Deco 03 is XP-Pen’s latest addition to their Deco series of screen-less tablets. It is made to compete with Wacom’s Intuos Pro line while costing only as much as the low-end Intuos tablets.

The main reason why I decided to buy the XP-Pen Deco 03 instead of the previous XP-Pen Deco 01 is because the Deco 03 uses a newer more premium looking pen than the Deco 01 which just uses a simple plastic pen.
How good is this tablet?
Design and build quality: Really solid!
Tablet drivers: Very good!
Drawing experience: Quite superb!

Overall: A very worthwhile buy for 100 USD.

My verdict:
-If you are a beginner, I can wholeheartedly recommend this over the XP-Pen Deco 03 . It has a drawing experience on par tablets, and I would certainly recommend spending your 100 USD on this tablet.
-If you are an experienced tablet user, the choice will depend on what you need for your art. If you know you need pen tilt/rotation, then the Wacom Intuos Pro is really your only option, but if you don’t care about those features, this tablet is a completely worthy alternative which feels fantastic to use. I would even go so far as to say this is the closest any company has gotten to Wacom so far.
Important specifications
Price: 99.99 USD (when this review was written) https://www.amazon.com/Wireless-Graphics-Battery-free-Shortcut-pressure/dp/B07BF9GNFD .
Active Area: 10 x 5.62 inches
Pen Type: Battery-free
Pen Buttons: 2 side buttons, no eraser
Pen Pressure: 8192
Pen Tilt Sensitivity: None
Expresskeys: 6 buttons, 1 spin wheel
Multi-touch: None
Other features: Wireless

What’s in the box?

The things that come in the box:

Deco 03 tablet
Battery-free pen
Pen case
Tablet cable (USB type-A to USB type-C)
Wireless receiver (USB type-A)
Pen nib replacement x8
4GB USB drive (with tablet drivers and other info on it)
Anti-fouling art glove
User manual
“Thank you” card

There is no driver installation CD. Instead, there is a 4GB USB drive with the drivers and manual on it. However, it is always recommended to get the most current drivers directly from XP-Pen’s site instead of using the included ones because the included ones may be outdated.

The tablet has a fairly simple design with just a flat surface and nothing special going on around it. The only special flair is the red dial in the corner of the tablet.

The tablet feels quite durable when doing a simple twist test by gripping both ends of the tablet and twisting.The surface of the tablet is fairly rough and gives drawing on the tablet a nice amount of resistance.

Since I mainly use XP-Pen Artist 22E screen-less tablets which are much smoother, the rough texture felt a bit coarse to me at first, but it started feeling nice fairly quickly and I found it quite enjoyable to draw on.

The tablet surface is certainly wearing and I can clearly see the marks where I have been drawing. I am completely certain that it will end up smoothing out really quickly from normal use.

I have to question XP-Pen and why they say the surface is “durable and resistant to scratches” on the XP-Pen Deco 03 product page because the surface shows clear signs of wear from normal use. this is not a cause for concern whatsoever as wearing off the texture does not affect the tablets drawing capabilities whatsoever.

The back of the tablet has the usual information sticker and rubber feet. The rubber feet do a good job of keeping the tablet in place while drawing.

Also on the back of the tablet is the wireless on/off switch. Make sure you read the manual to know exactly how to set up and use the wireless mode if you intend to use that.

The edge of the tablet is not rounded like most other tablets. This means that if your table is higher than your elbow, it is possible that the tablet will feel uncomfortable against your wrist because of the edge.

I would have very much preferred a rounded edge to give artists a more comfortable experience while drawing for long periods of time. This is one of my few nitpicks about this tablet.

The tablet has 6 expresskeys and the rotating red dial in one corner of the tablet.

The 6 expresskeys have fairly good feedback when clicking them, but I would have preferred them to be slightly easier to click. They require a bit more force than I would like to click them, and they’re actually pretty loud when you click them. They’re certainly use-able, but I believe they could be better.

The main selling point of this tablet is apparently the red dial. It spins really smoothly and clicks nicely every ~15 degrees of rotation. I have no complaints about its quality, but I was never a fan of wheel-type expresskeys so it only acts as an accessory for me.
The other reviews of the Deco 03 I have seen so far praise the red dial for being the main reason they like the tablet, but I really cannot see it as a plus. In my opinion, the quality rubber grip pen is the real advantage here.

Personally, I need at least 12 expresskeys to do all my art on my tablet without touching the keyboard, so the 6 expresskeys plus red dial are not enough for me. Also, to use multiple functions on the dial, you need to assign a KL/KR Switch function to one of the 6 expresskeys, reducing the number of expresskeys you can actually use to 5.
One other thing about the red dial is that the middle of the dial is a button, but pressing it does nothing and there’s no way to program it in the drivers. I wish they had made the button on the dial programmable, or at least made it the KL/KR Switch function so that I can make use of multiple functions on the dial without committing 1 of the 6 expresskeys to the KL/KR Switch function.

Although I tested the expresskeys for a bit, I decided to mainly use my keyboard for my shortcuts.

The cable port is on the expresskeys side of the tablet. This tablet has a USB type-C port so it is capable of using the L-shaped cable in the opposite direction which makes the tablet completely use-able in left-handed mode.

Many people seem to have a misconception that the buttons are right-hand oriented, but in left-handed mode, you can use your thumb for the red dial and other fingers for the buttons. It is certainly use-able, but it’s a slightly different experience than what right-handed people would deal with.
Of course, this is under the assumption that you’re going to use the expresskeys in the first place.

This pen is XP-Pen’s newest P05 battery-free pen. It mimics the ergonomic design of the Wacom Pro Pen and has a fairly large rubber grip with a bulge near the end to catch your fingers.

Holding the pen is very comfortable and it feels like I am using my old comfortable Wacom Intuos Pro pen again. It has a decent weight to it and is quite pleasing to hold. I’m glad XP-Pen finally decided to create this type of premium pen instead of continuing to use their thinner plastic pens.

The top of the pen has nothing. No eraser or charging port.
For the people who do not know if a pen eraser is useful or not, here is a fun fact. I did a little poll on the DeviantArt forums regarding the Wacom pen eraser. Only 3 out of 24 people who own a Wacom with a pen eraser said that they actually use it. The most common reason was that using shortcut buttons to switch to eraser is much faster than physically flipping the pen.

The pen nib does wear down on the XP-Pen Deco 03. However, the difference between the Intuos and the Deco 03 is that having a flat nib does not change the drawing experience at all on the Deco 03, so you don’t even need to change the flat nib in the first place.
On the Wacom Intuos 2018, it feels worse drawing with a flat nib than with a new nib because of the rubbery new texture they use, but with the XP-Pen Deco 03 having a flat nib does not change how much the pen grips the tablet at all because the surface is purely plastic.
The only thing you may notice is that the pen nib rolls over the flat side sometimes, but the same thing happens with Wacom’s tablets so it’s not really something you can complain about.

Also, the XP-Pen Deco 03 comes with 8 replacement nibs, and the Wacom Intuos only comes with 3 replacement nibs. That means you don’t have to worry about the nib wear as much on the XP-Pen Deco 03.

Now let’s talk about the pen case. It’s a pleasant surprise that this tablet comes with a pen case since it holds all your essentials when taking your tablet out with you.

One side of the pen case holds the pen. The lid is also quite heavy and is designed to become the pen stand which is a really useful design.

The other side of the pen case holds the pen nibs and wireless USB dongle. The pen nib remover hole is also built into the middle of the circle of nibs. It’s nice that you have everything you need for your pen in the case itself, and you’re way less likely to lose the small wireless USB receiver because there’s a spot for it in your pen case.

The one small problem I have with this design is that it is actually quite hard to pull out the pen nibs with your fingers. The best way to do it is by wedging your nail between the rubber and the pen nib, but I think they could have thought of a slightly better design to make it easier.

Overall, the pen case is a really nice bonus to go alongside an already really satisfactory Computer Drawing Pad for just 100 USD.

Tablet drivers
The XP-Pen Deco 03 uses the newest XP-Pen tablet drivers and they are extremely easy to install. You don’t even need to have your tablet plugged in to install them! Just go download the latest version directly from XP-Pen’s site and remove all other tablet drivers you have on your computer before installing it.

Once you’ve installed the driver, it should create a desktop shortcut for you to easily access the tablet settings. When your tablet is plugged in, the XP-Pen driver icon should appear in the system tray in the bottom right. You can also access the tablet settings by clicking on that.
Correction: The desktop icon only starts the XP-Pen driver software (if it doesn’t run automatically on startup) and clicking it doesn’t actually open the settings screen. To open the settings screen, you will need to click the XP-Pen icon in the system tray (the bottom right portion of your screen). 
If you don’t see the XP-Pen icon in the system tray, it could be automatically hidden by Windows. If so, click on the small white arrow to show all the system tray icons.

If the installer doesn’t prompt you to restart your computer after it finishes, I wholeheartedly suggesting restarting your computer anyways to allow Windows to properly update the files necessary for the driver to run smoothly.

The new XP-Pen driver is a simple one page driver with all the important settings in just one window. Here you can set the pen buttons and pen pressure, and choose which monitor the tablet maps to.

For the monitor mapping, you will want to choose your main display and select the Display Ratio button to make the mapping 1:1 with both horizontal and vertical motions.

You may need to check the Windows Ink checkbox at the bottom left for certain programs such as Photoshop which make use of it, but most programs will work better with Windows Ink turned off. If you are having problems with a program, try toggling the Windows Ink option.

One thing to note is that you can connect multiple XP-Pen tablets to the same computer and they will work! You will notice that at the top of the drivers, it has a drop-down menu that says “Deco 03”. If you connect other XP-Pen tablets that use the same drivers, they will all be modifiable and useable through that drop-down menu. I can connect my XP-Pen G640, XP-Pen Star 05, and XP-Pen AC19 Shortcut Remote at the same time as the XP-Pen Deco 03 and they all work and are completely programmable.
Of course, the only catch here is that only the XP-Pen devices which use the new drivers can do this. I believe the current compatible products are the Star 05Star 06, Star G430, Star G430S, Star G540, Star G640Deco 01Deco 03Artist13.3Artist15.6Artist16 Pro, and AC 19 Shortcut Remote.

In the Barrel Button Settings section, you can change the functions assigned to the pen buttons.

You can set basically all keyboard or mouse shortcuts that you can think of using the function key option, but you cannot combine mouse clicks with keyboard keys in the same function.

The Click Sensitivity section controls the pen pressure curve of the pen directly. This is the most important section in the tablet settings as you will need to adjust this to reduce how hard you have to press for higher pen pressures to reduce pen nib wear.

The default setting of the graph is a straight diagonal line, but to get a lighter pen pressure setting which is more common, you should move the top dot to around the middle, and move the middle dot somewhere near the top middle as I show in the above pictures. This will give you the feel closest to what you get from most other tablets, and it will also help to drastically reduce pen nib wear, but you should play around with it yourself to find out what suits you best.

One concern I have regarding the default pen pressure is the fact that beginners will not know to adjust the graph if they haven’t seen or read a review like mine which talks about it. If they could implement the more common “Light to Heavy” control bar alongside the graph, it could be easier on new users who may not understand how to make use of a pen pressure graph.

One cool thing to note is that the only other tablet drivers with this custom pen pressure graph is Wacom’s Intuos Pro and Cintiq drivers. Wacom’s low-end Intuos tablets do not offer you the pen pressure graph, and none of the other Wacom alternatives offer it either!

The Current Screen section controls which monitor your tablet is mapped to, and what area of your tablet is used. For the best results, pick the monitor you are going to draw on using the drop-down menu at the top, then click the Display Ratio button to match the drawing area of your tablet with the aspect ratio of your monitor.

Left-handed people will want to click the Left Hand Mode option and physically turn the tablet 180 degrees. As I mentioned before, the port is a USB type-C port so you will be able to reverse the cable direction 180 degrees as well to work in left-handed mode.

If you noticed earlier, there was a function called Switch Monitor among the functions you could assign to your pen buttons. That function cycles through all the available monitors in the drop-down list at the top of the Current Screen section when used.
If you click the Express Keys button in the bottom right, a new window will open up with the options for changing the functions assigned to the shortcut keys.
You can click the Dial tab to change the functions assigned to the red dial as well.

All the buttons can be assigned mouse clicks, keyboard functions, or the extra functions, just like the pen buttons.

The bar along the top of this window allows you to make program specific profiles which will only be active when the program you assigned is your current active window. It is a useful feature for people who want different functions for different programs.

One unfortunate thing about this driver is that you cannot export your settings. This means that if you ever need to uninstall and reinstall the drivers, all your settings will be reset to default and you will have to reconfigure all of them. I personally recommend copying down your shortcuts and settings onto a separate notepad file so that you can always reconfigure everything properly.

The drawing experience!
This tablet gave me a fantastic drawing experience that I really haven’t felt in quite a while. If we are just talking about the drawing experience itself, then I honestly think this tablet felt the best out of every screen-less tablet I have tested so far.

I only truly test my tablets on Clip Studio Paint because that’s all I use. You should contact XP-Pen support directly if you want to know if the tablet is compatible with the drawing program you use, but most major drawing programs should be compatible. Their customer support is also very kind so there’s no need to be afraid of contacting them directly.

Just like with the XP-Pen G640 which I reviewed previously, I was a bit taken aback by how hard I had to press the pen to get darker lines at first, but I simply adjusted the pen pressure curve and the stroke control felt extremely good after that. When doing gradual increases and decreases in pressure, the lines come out perfectly as expected and there are no skips or jumps in the pressure at all.

I really like these new XP-Pen drivers because the pen pressure behaves exactly as you would expect it to. The XP-Pen pen pressure is more linear than the Wacom and Huion tablets I have reviewed, and the fact that you can adjust the pen pressure curve directly is a massive plus.

If you look at the slow diagonal lines I did with a ruler on my testing page, you can certainly see some wobble, but it is small enough that you will not notice it, especially if you use the line stabilizers which are built into most art programs.

The roughness of the tablet may be slightly worrying, but it is nothing to worry about. It’s not as rough as Wacom, and since you have 8 replacement nibs it’s not a big problem. It feels no different drawing with a new nib and a flat nib, so you can just keep using the nib until it’s worn out so much that you can barely pull it out (but I recommend changing the nib before it gets so worn out that you can’t pull it out anymore).
You will eventually rub the texture of the tablet smooth like with Wacom’s tablets, but just like with Wacom, it’s nothing to worry about as you will still be able to draw on it.

Personally, I had a bit of discomfort with the non-rounded edge of the tablet because my table and tablet are higher than my elbow, but if I sit with my back straight, my elbow is high enough that the edge doesn’t really dig into my wrist. Of course, I wish XP-Pen had made the edge rounded instead but it shouldn’t particularly be a problem for most people.

One more thing to note is that, although the reading height is written as 10mm in the product specifications, the actual reading height is only ~5mm. However, it’s not a problem at all and doesn’t affect your drawing at all, but if you have previous tablet experience, you may notice that you can’t hover as high before the pen stops being sensed by the tablet.

Regarding the wireless mode of the tablet, it works, but it’s not perfect. If you look at the photo above, you can see that there are times when the cursor does not keep up with my motion and causes abrupt corners in what should be a smooth curve. As you can see, the jagged lines do not happen at all when using the cable connection. This is the same on both my Windows 8.1 and Windows 10 computers.

It is important to note that the above test is done with really fast motions. The jagged curves happen less frequently at my normal drawing speed, but it does happen nonetheless. Be warned that the wireless may not be “perfect” on this tablet, but it is certainly tolerable.

Another important thing to note is that I have the exact same problems with wireless on my XP-Pen Star 05. This most likely means that the quality of XP-Pen’s wireless technology is not ideal and you should look to Wacom and Huion instead if “perfect” wireless is an important feature for you.
Correction: The wireless started cutting out completely when I moved my tablet to around 60-70cm away from the receiver and plugged in a USB drive in the USB port beside the receiver. My only conclusion from this is that the XP-Pen receiver is extremely susceptible to interference and is not capable of more than 50cm wireless before becoming extremely unstable. I recommend that you pretend that this tablet does not come with wireless.

Conclusion
I really recommend this Digital Drawing Tablet to any beginner who is considering a 100 USD XP-Pen Star 06 . I think your 100 USD are better spent on the XP-Pen Deco 03 instead. If you’re wondering about drawing software, give the free programs FireAlpaca, Medibang Paint, and Krita a go. They are fantastic free programs which are more than enough for beginners. There is no need to get paid programs until you get the hang of digital art and know you need the special niche features they offer.

Even for an experienced user, I can recommend this wholeheartedly if you want an experience similar to that of the Wacom Intuos Pro. However, if you know that you need pen tilt/rotation for your art, then the Wacom Intuos Pro is your only option even if it’s more costly. With your experience, you should know whether pen tilt/rotation is worth the extra money for you or not and you should make your decision based on that, but this is certainly a tablet worth your consideration.

About XP-Pen pen compatibility
There is something that I have noticed since I have all the XP-Pen battery-free pens (P01, P03S, P05), and that is the fact that all of XP-Pen’s battery-free pens seem to use the same frequencies! This means that you can use any of XP-Pen’s P01, P03S, or P05 battery-free pens on any XP-Pen tablet which uses one of those three pens.
This conclusion comes from testing all the pens on my XP-Pen G640 (uses P01 pen), XP-Pen Star05 (uses P03S pen), and XP-Pen Deco 03 (uses P05 pen). They’re all able to sense and draw with any of those three pens!

This is quite exciting because it means that you should theoretically be able to buy the most comfortable P05 pen for any other XP-Pen screen-less tablet (I cannot confirm that this same cross compatibility applies for the Artist13.3 and Artist15.6 drawing monitors). For instance, you could upgrade your Deco 01 (60 USD) with a P05 pen (30 USD), and the total cost will be 90 USD which is actually less than buying the Deco 03 for 100 USD!

Of course, you should not just take my word for it. Make sure you ask XP-Pen directly about the compatibility of the pen with the tablet you’re interested in matching it with.

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Graphic Design Monitor XP-Pen Artist 22E for Drawing directly with the tablet
Article publié le 12/05/2018

Whether you are an artist, graphic designer, or architect, a drawing tablet is an essential tool in this digital age. Allowing you to quickly transfer digital drawings into articulated masterpieces, they are a must for any creative professional and can allow hobbyists to take their digital art to the next level.

Figuring out the best tablets for drawing isn't always easy, so we've taken some of the guesswork out of the equation. What you'll end up with depends both on your needs, and your budget, but the good news is that with such a wide variety of graphics tablets on the market, there's something for everyone.

Before moving on to our list, it's important to understand types of tablets available. A graphics tablet hooks into your computer, allowing you to draw on it with a stylus and see the results on your monitor. If you prefer the look and feel of drawing directly on the screen, then you'll want to consider a tablet monitor. There's an added expense, but some people find drawing on the screen more intuitive. Here, you'll want to pay close attention to screen quality in order to get accurate color results.

If you are looking for something that can double as a personal entertainment device (letting you read emails or watch movies when you aren't getting creative), a tablet computer is your best bet. From Apple to Microsoft and beyond, more and more companies are balancing the perks of a regular tablet with the high-quality screen resolution and drawing applications of a graphic tablet. Scroll down to explore the options!

Best Graphic Monitor for Professionals Beginners Artists Animation

This Artist 22E tablet comes with a stand built into the back that you can unfold to varying degrees. It uses strong rubber legs spread horizontally so it covers a wider base. This limits shaking or any mobility while in use.

The screen itself is brilliant with LED lights and a strong 1920×1080 resolution. This can both mirror your PC or it can work as a secondary monitor.

When you make a mark on the screen it loads fast. The response time is incredible for this model and it’s much better than other XP-Pen devices.

You can draw from any angle and still keep a strong view of the screen. There’s no major glare but there is a thin coating that makes the surface super smooth. Opinions vary on screen textures but I think this smooth screen works great.

XP-Pen ships this unit with an optional screen protector which can add some texture if you need it. You’ll also get a free artist glove along with two stylus pens that both include a toggle button to switch between pen & eraser mode.

Both pens do use batteries and they’ll need to be charged every so often. But XP-Pen is nice enough to include 2 so if a pen dies you can always swap to the other while charging the first.

This tablet does not have any hotkeys or express keys on the display. You do have a button on the stylus but it’s not for running actions in your painting software. The only buttons on the display are towards the bottom for adjusting brightness, resolution, and other display settings.

But for the price and for all the extras this is a sweet deal. It’s plenty large enough for concept art and it’ll last a long time even with daily use.

Bottom Line: Grab the Artist 22E if you like the design and can live without any express keys. This tablet is huge and it’s a little smaller/lighter than the UG-2150. They’re both very comparable models so if you have a brand preference then go with this one.

My Review experience about the Graphics Drawing Tablet XP-Pen Artist 22E

I waited a long time after receiving my Artist 22E before writing this review, because after using, and loving, my Artist 10S, I wanted to really put the 22E through its paces.
I knew that it was going to be useful, if only for the workflow of sitting at a desk, retouching and drawing with a pen directly on a screen at a high resolution and large size.
Although the screen is only 1920 x 1080, which is beginning to be on the low end of monitor resolution for editing, I can't imagine needing any more when working in a tactile way. Potentially, a professional photographer might want to use a 4K monitor in addition, to check and view photos, but the actual process of working on images is well suited to the HD resolution and doesn't leave me wanting any more.
I will go into it further, but I will say one thing: the Artist 22E has revolutionalised my workflow. I have ceased to use my laptop for anything but a keyboard when working on photo or video editing, and I regularly use it for regular tasks as well. When I don't want to use the pen, I use it as my main monitor and my previous 22" monitor has been sitting on the floor since the 22E arrived.
I don't want to repeat myself too much, so if you want to see a little more of the workflow with both the Artist 10S and the Artist 22E , go check out my review of the Artist 10S.
Now, the reasons for wanting a graphics pen are very obvious, but a pen display is another beast. A pen display is amazing for retouching photos, because you see the changes you are making, underneath the pen you are using. It makes retouching so much more intuitive. Things that I would ordinarily be changing and altering and erasing can be done in a few quick strokes because I get it right the first time.
The same can be said for drawing. Seeing the image appear underneath the pen, as it would on paper, speeds up your workflow and gives a natural feel to the work.
Getting away from pressure sensitivity, one of the main sales points of any graphics tablet, using a pen to do simple mouse work is also much quicker. Working in Adobe Lightroom, which is full of sliders and toggles, is much faster because I don't have to drag the cursor across the screen. The buttons on the side of the Artist 22E (being right handed, I only use the ones of the left side, but it's a nice addition that they are repeated on both sides for those who are left handed or ambidextrous) helps with the process too.
Mostly, my button configuration is as follows - Increase Brush Size, Decrease Brush Size, Zoom in, Zoom out. Those four buttons save so much time when airbrushing.

Oh, and speaking of VESA mounts, the XP-Pen Artist 22E comes with a stand but there was just no way I could have used it. I don’t want to constantly have to put something this large away. And I have no desk space to leave it permanently on the desk. More room would be great but I’m having to work with the space I have right now. So, I have nothing to say about the stand that comes with it. It seemed well built and sturdy enough, but the first thing I did was remove it! I’m using an AmazonBasics ergonomic arm mount that has two benefits for me. One I can swing the whole thing away from my desk when I’m not using it. Otherwise, it would block my keyboard. And when I am using it, I can basically have the display closer to me and move it around as I work. This keeps me from getting a stiff neck or from having to squint at the monitor. Remember those aging eyes that set me down this path in the first place!

By the way, I have two other arm mounts at my desk – one for my main screen and one for a laptop stand. After using this AmazonBasics one, I’d love to have the spare change to replace the rest. It just moves around and adjusts so much easier! I don’t move the others as much but maybe I would if they moved this easy!

What’s Good:
Good color definition on the monitor and good viewing angles
Very large drawing area, a pleasure to draw on
Pen works really well, good range of pressure though it does blow out a little on the medium to high end a little bit

A nice alternative for those not ready to invest in a Cintiq, as they have a lot of similar features. Includes a rechargeable pen with 2,048 levels of pressure and 8 express buttons, but is not capable of multitouch (meaning you can't draw with your fingers).

XP-Pen is also the safest brand for non-techies who don’t want to risk dealing with a messy setup process. Most other tablets work fine as long as you have the newest version of Windows or OS X. But there have even been tablets that had issues with Windows 10 in the past.When you go with XP-Pen you know your money is going to a trustworthy brand.

Recommendation

Software and Driver installation was really smooth ,All of the outputs you could want. And all cables included ,Screen size, Resolution, and Color reproduction quality ,Priced at $550 USD currently on https://www.amazon.com/Artist22E-22-Inch-Display-Graphic-Monitor/dp/B01M9EURM1 .With the pros definitely outweighing the minor cons of this product, I can't help but have to recommend this to anyone considering this unit. well exactly like it, this product has an outstanding value that can't be beat. Stop thinking about, just buy this now.

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Digital Drawing Tablet XP-Pen Deco 01 for Artists
Article publié le 28/04/2018

The Deco 01 has a classy matt black finish. The downside is you can have any color as long as it’s black! On saying that I don’t think this tablet would look as good in any other color as the matt black really does look cool!

Retro Backplate and Secure Tablet Feet
The back of the tablet is described as ‘Retro’ on the XP-Pen.com web page for the Deco 01. To be honest the back of a tablet really doesn’t really interest me much – however that’s just my opinion. What I am interested in on the reverse side of any tablet is how it sits on a worksurface. It needs to be secure on whatever surface it is placed on. In my case I usually work at a desk or inclined flat easel stand.

I was pleased to find that the reverse of the Deco 01 has rubber padded feet in each corner with a neoprene feel to them – slightly tactile for grip. They are not just stuck onto the back of the tablet and liable to peel off.

They are secured in small depressions in the back plastic casing. This is thoughtful design as it adds a lot of strength and durability to the pads. As a result the tablet sits rock solid on any surface letting me draw without a hint of tablet movement.
Express Key Positioning
There are 8 customizable express keys which are right at your fingertips without being obtrusive. Some tablets are rammed with ‘on surface features’ that just get in the way.

The express keys are lined up in two groups of four on one side (reversible depending on left or right hand use of the tablet).

This is far enough from the active area but near enough for instant use. The keys are also large enough and separated from each other to make them easy to use.

Again this has been well thought out at design stage to make optimum use of the express keys.

I have tried other tablet brands where the express keys are in such an awkward place that it is often quicker to switch tools on screen – taking the ‘express’ out of the express keys!

XP-Pen Deco 01 Digital Drawing Tablet – Installing the Tablet Driver
Things that really bug me about any gadget, that requires some form of installation is the lack of information on how to install / program the device. I was recently asked to review another digital drawing tablet but due to a total lack of logical information I could not get it to work. I contacted the supplier who wanted the review but they failed to respond – the result as you can imagine was no review!

Thankfully the instructions for the Deco 01 were easy to follow and worked first time I downloaded the driver from the XP-Pen.com web site. It placed the Pen Tablet Setting application in my applications folder (program files in Windows) and a shortcut on the desktop (optional).

The Pen Tablet Setting App allows you to tailor the shortcut keys to different software that you may use. I find it off putting when any gadgets get so complicated that you end up being overdosed with technical capability. However, XP-Pen.com have got it cracked.
That’s a huge tick in the box for me! I hate it when tyou have to borrow Einstein’s brain to be able to understand, program and use the features!!!

It is simple to recallibrate the tablet from right to left hand use (or vice versa). This is easy in the Pen Tablet Settings.

To reprogram the customizable express keys was also very straightforward. The whole setting up process was smooth as silk and I believe that most people would be able to navigate the Pen tablet Setting control interface easily.

There is also have the newest XP-Pen Deco 03 Graphics Drawing Tablet !

Like most of the latest tablets coming out it has a C-USB connection. The power lead supply has a male C-USB connector which attaches to the tablet and a standard USB connected to the computer. The cable is 1.5m in length which is a decent size to work with.
XP-Pen Deco 01 Graphics Drawing Tablet – Active Drawing Area
On the top surface of the tablet are four white right angled markers which light up to indicate the active area thus defining your drawing space. These ‘landing lights’ are a nice feature as it allows you to see exactly where the active area is when drawing in lower lighting and even in pitch dark conditions. It also adds to the stylish look of the tablet.
XP-Pen Deco 01 Graphics Drawing Tablet – Pen Stylus
The battery free pen stylus is another big plus for me. It is not as ‘clunky’ as a lot of graphics drawing pens I have reviewed are and has a nice thin profile with ergonomic shaping to the barrel. The profile of the pen is triangular with rounded corners – far easier to grip and doesn’t kill your fingers after you have been drawing for a long time without a break.

I use LAMY Calligraphy pens for pen and ink drawing and they have a very similar design this makes the drawing experience much more comfortable. Round pens tend to make your hands hurt and often cramp up after prolonged use.

The pen stylus draws beautifully and is one of the best graphics drawing tablet pens that I have used. Due in part to the ergonomically shaped barrel and also to the excellent responsiveness.

The stylus has 8192 levels of pressure sensitivity which is a big step up from the general standards of 2048 LPS. As technology advances the drawing experience gets much closer to the real thing. On saying that a graphics drawing tablet can in some ways be better than the real thing!
XP-Pen Deco 01 Digital Drawing Tablet – Pen Stand and Spare Nib Store
With the pen is another great feature the pen stand. It has a nice weight so it’s not going to be rattling around the table and doesn’t take up much room.

On the downside (and this is a very minor blip) the pen is stored horizontally on the top of the pen stand – but this is just my personal preference. I would love it to stand upright in a secure slot as would a quill pen in an ink pen stand.

The stand is approx.1.5 inch square with a domed top. It has a neat feature as XP-Pen have designed this to store the 8 spare nibs. With a simple twist action the pen stand separated into two pieces with the bottom half securely containing the nibs. The base of the pen holder has a small slot to extract nibs and replace them in the pen stylus.

XP-Pen.com have got it just about right with awaiting stylish pen on the holder. Just a pity about resting the pen horizontally.

XP-Pen Deco 01 Digital Drawing Tablet – Other Features and Freebies
Graphics Tablet Anti Fouling Glove Included
One thing I really liked was the inclusion of the tablet glove in this set. For those on the tight budget it is one less item to buy amounts another tick in the box for XP-Pen.com.

For those who have never used a graphics tablet glove they are a fantastic asset to have as they keep your hand gliding smoothly with the pen (particularly when your hands get clammy in hot weather) and also keep the tablet surface dust free.

Compatability with Operating Systems and Graphics Software
The deco 01 tablet is compatible with Windows 10/ 8/ 7 Mac OS version 10.8 and higher. It is stated as running with Photoshop, SA 1, painter, illustrator, trip station plus more in other words it works with all the major graphics software that you are likely to use.

I sent the Deco 01 up on my Mac book Pro. After removing an existing tablet driver (as you need to remove previous drivers for this to work) the installation of the driver from the XP pen.com website was easy to follow and use.

There is a hardcopy manual that comes with the set or you can download a Pdf from the XP-pen.com website. I found it easier to read a Pdf – being of an age when the eyes don’t like small print!.

The beauty of the downloadable Pdf is that it is always to hand on my Mac and I don’t have to go rummaging around to find it (and I can see it to read it!).

Another enhanced feature that XP-Pen.com have put into the Deco 01 is the report rate. In other words the speed at which the interaction between the stylus nib on tablet surface is reported to the software to appear on the screen.

The report rates of the deco 01 is now 266 PS which is very fast and in conjunction with with the 8192 levels of pen pressure sensitivity gives a great performance and one experience.
Another enhanced feature that XP-Pen.com have put into the Deco 01 is the report rate. In other words the speed at which the interaction between the stylus nib on tablet surface is reported to the software to appear on the screen.

The report rates of the deco 01 is now 266 PS which is very fast and in conjunction with with the 8192 levels of pen pressure sensitivity gives a great performance and one experience.
Conclusion – How did I rate the XP-Pen Deco 01 Digital Drawing Tablet?

Only one very minor nit picky things for me and it’s just my personal preference. That was the pen holder i.e pen placement, which I mentioned earlier (pen lies flat on the pen holder and I would have liked to see it more secure in a slot in the upright position).

In the big scheme of things does not detract from the overall standard. As you can see from my verdict this is a great all round tablet.

It has actually made me rethink which is the best tablet in this class and I have to say this is as good or maybe even better than other similar tablets. My previous front runner was the Wacom Intuos Range (Art, Comic, Photo and Draw) but the XP-Pen Deco 01 has really given that particular range of Wacom Intuos tablets a really good run for its money.

The differences between the two brands are cost and software (included graphics software as a package). Wacom do offer included software. However, there is such a price difference between the Deco 01 and the equivalent Wacom Tablet that the XP-Pen Deco 01 gets the edge.

I always tell anyone that wants Procartoon to review a product that I will always give an honest review. in this case it was a pleasure to put the Deco 01 through it’s paces and discover that it passed with flying colors in every aspect.

Who is the XP-Pen Deco 01 Digital Drawing Tablet for?

This will suit any level of drawing skill from absolute beginners to professional artists.

If you’re on a tight budget but want quality a lot of great features this fits the bill.

If you are looking for second more mobile tablet, this is just the right size with lots of valuable features. Plus it is very strong and durable to be carried around.

This could also be perfect for getting kids into digital drawing. The Deco 01 is very reasonable in cost and not too overcomplicated for young artists. Possibly a good bulk buy for schools and colleges.

If you would like more information on the XP-Pen Deco 01 Digital Drawing Tablet visit the website : https://www.amazon.com/10x6-25-Graphics-Battery-free-shortcut-pressure/dp/B077P6BQP7

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graphicstablet
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XP-Pen is an professional and reliable supplier of graphics tablets,pen display monitors,light pads, stylus pens and more digital graphical products. In 2005, XP-Pen was founded in Japan ,We have 13 years of experience in tablet device manufacturing ,we are the Brand Recommendation of Amazon.
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